Hepatitis

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Hepatitis A, B, and C

Hepatitis A | Hepatitis B | Hepatitis C

No Warning Signs : Video | Hepatitis C Infographic

 

Hepatitis is a contagious disease which affects the liver. Hepatitis A, B and C are the most common types in Texas. The virus lives in the liver and is in the blood as well as certain body fluids of those infected (e.g. semen, vaginal fluids, open sores etc.)

 The best way to prevent hepatitis A and B is through vaccination.

  • Hepatitis is not only spread through sex 
  • Hepatitis B and C can turn into life-long illnesses
  • There is also a hepatitis D and E

What are the signs and symptoms of hepatitis?

Hepatitis A, B, and C generally have the same symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue (Tiredness)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dark urine
  • Clay or grey-colored bowel movement
  • Joint pain
  • Jaundice (a yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • A person sick with hepatitis may or may not have all of these symptoms.

The only way to know if you have hepatitis is to get tested. If you think you have hepatitis you should contact your doctor. 

Hepatitis A

How is hepatitis A spread?

  • When a person ingests (eats or drinks) the virus from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the feces or stool of an infected person

How do I keep from getting hepatitis A?

  • Get vaccinated
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water
    • After using the bathroom
    • After changing a diaper
    • Before eating or preparing food

 Hepatitis B

How is hepatitis B spread?

Through percutaneous (puncture through skin contact) or mucous membrane (e.g. throat, nose, mouth, rectum, vagina etc.) contact with infectious blood or body fluids.

  • Percutaneous
    • Injection drug usage
      • Sharing needles, syringes, or "works"
    • Tattooing 
    • Piercings
    • Acupuncture
    • Injuries from sharps instruments (needlestick injuries)
    • Unsterilized needle usage
  • Sexual (with an infected partner) 
    • Unprotected sex
    • Multiple sex partners
    • Men who have sex with men
  • Other
    • Sharing razors, toothbrushes, or nail clippers with an infected person
    • Contact with scratches, abrasions, burns, other lesions of an infected person
    • Birth to a hep B infected mother

Hepatitis B is not spread through food or water, sharing eating utensils, breastfeeding, hugging, kissing, handholding, coughing, or sneezing.

How do I keep from getting Hepatitis B?

  • Get vaccinated
  • Use condoms for sexual activity with someone who may have hepatitis B
  • Limit contact with the blood or body fluids of someone who has hepatitis B
  • Make sure that newborns born to mothers with hepatitis B get protective vaccination and medication at birth

Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP)

  • Hepatitis B can be passed to a newborn during delivery

The Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention program (PHBPP) case manages hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive pregnant women through delivery, and their newborns through the immunization process and post vaccine serology testing.

No Warning Signs: CDC.gov

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Vietnamese: Tiếng Việt

 

Hepatitis C

How does a person get Hep C?

Mostly through percutaneous (puncture through skin contact) contact with infectious blood or body fluids.

  • Percutaneous (through the skin)
    • Injection drug usage
      • Sharing needles, syringes, or "works"
    • Tattooing 
    • Injuries from sharps instruments (needlestick injuries)
    • Piercings
    • Acupuncture
  • Sexual (with an infected partner) 
    • Unprotected sex
    • Multiple sex partners
    • Men who have sex with men
  • Other
    • Sharing razors, toothbrushes, or nail clippers contaminated with infectious blood

How do I keep from getting Hepatitis C?

  • Use condoms for sexual activity with someone who may have hepatitis C 
  • Careful use of sterilized needles for medical procedures or medication injection 
  • Avoid injection drug usage
  • Limit contact with the blood or body fluids of someone who has hepatitis C

CDC.gov - Know More Hepatitis Campaign: Find out if you have Hepatitis C

Get tested for Hep C, it could save your life.

 

For More Information

 

Contact Information 

1000 Martin Road, Amarillo, TX 79107

Phone: 806-378-6300 

Fax: 806-378-6306

24 Hour Emergency Number: 806-680-8980

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